Glasshouse Country
B. Waldock
Glass House Mountains Aboriginal Legend
It         is         said         that   Tibrogargan,         the         father,         and         Beerwah,         the         mother,         had         many         children.         Coonowrin        the         eldest,         Beerburrum,         the   Tunbubudla         twins,         the         Coochin   twins,         Ngungun,         Tibberoowuccum,        Miketebumulgrai,         and         Saddleback.         There         was         Round         who         was         fat         and         small         and         Wildhorse         who        was         always         paddling         in   the   sea.            One         day,         Tibrogargan         was         gazing         out         to         sea         and         noticed         a         great        rising         of         the         waters.         Hurrying         off      to         gather         his         younger         children,         in         order         to         flee         to         the   safety   of the   mountains   in   the   west,   he   called   out   to   Coonowrin   to   help   his   mother   Beerwah,   who   was   again   with   child.           Looking         back         to         see         how         Coonowrin         was         assisting         Beerwah,         Tibrogargan         was         greatly         angered         to        see         him         running         off         alone.         He         pursued         Coonowrin         and,   raising   his   club,   struck   the   latter   such   a   mighty blow   that   it   dislodged   Coonowrin’s   neck,   and   he   has   never   been   able   to   straighten   it   since.            When         the         floods        had         subsided         and         the         family         returned         to         the         plains,         the         other         children         teased         Coonowrin         about        his         crooked         neck.         Feeling         ashamed,   Coonowrin         went         over         to         Tibrogargan         and         asked         for         his        forgiveness,         but         filled         with         shame         at         his         son’s         cowardice,         Tibrogargan         could         do         nothing         but         weep copious         tears,         which,         trickling         along         the         ground,         formed         a         stream         that         flowed         into         the         sea.         Then        Coonowrin         went         to         his         brothers         and         sisters,         but         they         also   wept         at         the         shame         of         their         brother’s        cowardice.         The         lamentations         of         Coonowrin’s         parents         and         of         his         brothers         and         sisters         at         his        disgrace   explain   the presence of the numerous small streams. Traditional Owners. The Gubbi Gubbi people are the traditional custodians of the area. For more information 
                                               Living With Water by Kuran Wurrun
Gubbi Gubbi people have lived on their lands for thousands of years. Their history is long and based on caring for the land through understanding nature. Respect for tradition is important to their future.This book is intended to act as a guide to Gubbi Gubbi  and to understand more of their unique attachment to the land. Come and begin to learn their stories under our clear blue skies.     Bruce Cresswell  Author, Photographer
Glasshouse Country
Glass House Mountains Aboriginal Legend
It         is         said         that   Tibrogargan,         the         father,         and         Beerwah,        the         mother,         had         many         children.         Coonowrin         the         eldest,        Beerburrum,         the   Tunbubudla         twins,         the         Coochin   twins,        Ngungun,            Tibberoowuccum,            Miketebumulgrai,            and        Saddleback.         There         was         Round         who         was         fat         and         small        and         Wildhorse         who         was         always         paddling         in   the   sea.           One         day,         Tibrogargan         was         gazing         out         to         sea         and        noticed         a         great         rising         of         the         waters.         Hurrying         off         to        gather         his         younger         children,         in         order         to         flee         to         the safety   of   the   mountains   in   the   west,   he   called   out   to   Coonowrin to    help    his    mother    Beerwah,    who    was    again    with    child.            Looking         back         to         see         how         Coonowrin         was         assisting        Beerwah,         Tibrogargan         was         greatly         angered         to         see         him        running         off         alone.         He         pursued         Coonowrin         and,   raising   his club,    struck    the    latter    such    a    mighty    blow    that    it    dislodged Coonowrin’s   neck,   and   he   has   never   been   able   to   straighten   it since.            When         the         floods         had         subsided         and         the         family        returned         to         the         plains,         the         other         children         teased        Coonowrin         about         his         crooked         neck.         Feeling         ashamed, Coonowrin         went         over         to         Tibrogargan         and         asked         for         his        forgiveness,         but         filled         with         shame         at         his         son’s        cowardice,         Tibrogargan         could         do         nothing         but         weep copious         tears,         which,         trickling         along         the         ground,         formed        a         stream         that         flowed         into         the         sea.         Then         Coonowrin        went         to         his         brothers         and         sisters,         but         they         also   wept         at        the            shame            of            their            brother’s            cowardice.            The          lamentations            of            Coonowrin’s            parents            and            of            his          brothers         and         sisters         at         his         disgrace         explain         the   presence of the numerous small streams. Traditional Owners. The Gubbi Gubbi people are the traditional custodians of the area. For more information 
© Bob Waldock